BBC settles libel suit from wronged politician

Bookmark and Share
Make text smaller Make text larger

LONDON – The BBC reached a settlement Thursday with the Conservative politician wrongly implicated in a child sex abuse scandal.


The BBC has already apologized for linking 70-year-old Alistair McAlpine, a member of the House of Lords, to child sex abuse that happened decades ago in Wales. The mistaken report, broadcast nearly two weeks ago, has caused turmoil within BBC management ranks and led to the resignation of its chief.


The British broadcaster said it had resolved McAlpine’s libel claim, calling it a “comprehensive” settlement .


The politician will receive $293,200 in damages and the terms of the agreement will be announced in court in a few days.


McAlpine said in a statement he was delighted to have reached a “quick and early” settlement and now will seek settlements from people who had named him on Twitter.


Earlier, he told BBC radio he had been shocked by the report, which did not directly name him but led to Internet chatter about his purported role. He said the BBC had not contacted him to try to verify the report before it was televised on its “Newsnight” program.


“They should have called me and I would have told them exactly what they learned later on – that it was complete rubbish,” he said.


He expressed sympathy for the sex abuse victim who had mistakenly told BBC that McAlpine was the culprit, pointing out that the victim had suffered greatly because of the abuse.


The lawmaker seemed shaken by the accusations against him: “To find yourself a figure of public hatred, unjustifiably, is terrifying.”


The BBC’s crisis involving coverage of child sex abuse started last month when it was heavily criticized for deciding not to report allegations of shocking abuses committed by one of its top hosts, the late Jimmy Savile, who died last year at age 84.


New questions have been raised about the possible role in the Savile scandal of Mark Thompson, who was BBC director general until Sept. 16 and this week became chief executive officer of the New York Times Co.


Thompson has said he did not know about the allegations against Savile and was not involved in the decision to shelve a BBC documentary about the TV star’s alleged abuses. Critics, however, say this claim is undermined by a legal letter written on Thompson’s behalf in early September that advised the Sunday Times of London not to publish a story about the Savile allegations.


Bookmark and Share Make text smaller Make text larger
comments powered by Disqus
Most Popular
July
2014
Tuesday
29
S M T W T F S
29 30 1 2 3 4 5
6 7 8 9 10 11 12
13 14 15 16 17 18 19
20 21 22 23 24 25 26
27 28 29 30 31 1 2
O-R's Poll Question of the Day