Johnstown redeveloper fired for ‘double-dipping’

  • February 26, 2013

JOHNSTOWN (AP) – Amid investigations, the head of a Western Pennsylvania city’s redevelopment authority has been fired for allegedly accepting $130,000 in consulting fees from an agency that was working with the authority on an office park.

Ronald Repak, 60, was fired as executive director of the Johnstown Redevelopment Authority because the alleged “double-dipping” violated an ethics agreement Repak had with the authority, said authority solicitor William Barbin.

Repak had been the agency’s executive director for 30 years. The Associated Press could not immediately locate a personal phone number for him on Tuesday.

Repak was fired Monday at a special meeting of the authority board, which also accepted the resignation of his administrative assistant. Repak, his assistant, and a board secretary had been on paid administrative leave since Feb. 13; the secretary’s status remained unchanged.

No criminal charges have been filed, but Barbin and other authority officials have acknowledged federal and state investigations.

Repak allegedly billed Conemaugh Health System, a Johnstown-based hospital network, through a business known as Diversified Development Technologies. Repak allegedly received the money for helping the health system develop an office park, known as Conemaugh Medical Park, in conjunction with the authority from 2004 to 2007.

Conemaugh Health System officials declined comment because the matter is under investigation.

Repak has been the authority’s executive director since January 1983, when his predecessor resigned during a scandal into how flood-recovery funds were handled. Three members of the authority board also resigned in that bid-rigging scandal, which eventually resulted in nine officials pleading guilty.


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