Beating Greene’s sedentary lifestyles

  • March 26, 2013

Accolades and kudos to Observer-Reporter staff members Brad Hundt and Jon Stevens for the highly enlightening March 21 article “Healthy living? Apparently not in Greene.” The article uses many descriptive words and phrases to define the culture of Greene County. My favorite is the phrase “sedentary lifestyles.”

Not recognizing the word “sedentary” – I’m a Greene County native – I rushed to the dictionary. The definition offers several variations, all of which appropriately apply in some degree to the culture of Greene County. My choice as the most fitting is “fixed to one spot, as a barnacle.”

The definition for the word “barnacle” also has several variations. The one I find to be most fitting is “a person or thing hard to get rid of.”

For many years, the sedentary lifestyles of Greene County have shamelessly inflicted hardship and privation upon the general population. The low health ranking induced by our chronically depressed economy seems alien to the American way of life.

These problems cannot be solved with government subsidized trails for hiking or walking, nor with nostalgic relics preserved as historical sites that no student of history will study.

These problems will be solved by getting rid of the barnacles. Hence, resurrect the plans for a Route 21 bypass of Waynesburg and for expanding the two traffic lanes to four from one side of the county to the other. The same is required for Route 88 from the northern part of the county to the south, with a bypass of Carmichaels.

Then, we will be able to say goodbye to our un-American “sedentary lifestyles” and all Greene County will become prosperous and beautiful, just like Waynesburg.

Paul Lagojda

Cumberland Township


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