Twenty-one years later, Pitino and Krzyzewski meet again

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INDIANAPOLIS – Mike Krzyzewski and Rick Pitino are finally doing an encore.


For the first time since their teams played perhaps the greatest game in the history of the NCAA tournament, Krzyzewski and Pitino will meet in the NCAA tournament today when top-seeded Louisville faces Duke. In the regional finals, no less.


Never mind that few of their current players were even born in 1992. Or that Pitino is no longer at Kentucky, having switched sides in the state’s civil war after his brief trip to Boston and the NBA ended badly.


Krzyzewski and Pitino are forever linked by that one game in Philadelphia, immortalized by Christian Laettner’s improbable shot.


“It’s one of those moments in time that helped define our sport,” Krzyzewski said Saturday. “When I’ve talked to Rick about it, we realize we were the lucky guys. We had different roles at that time, but we were both lucky to be there.”


Said Pitino, “It was like being in Carnegie Hall and seeing the best musician or the best singer. Just sitting there in amazement of what they were doing out on the basketball court.”


Krzyzewski and Pitino are two of the finest coaches of their generation, with five NCAA titles and 1,618 victories between them. Yet for all of their success, and for as good a friends as they are, Krzyzewski and Pitino rarely play each other.


When Louisville (32-5) and Duke (30-5) played in the Battle 4 Atlantis tournament in November – Duke won – it was the first time Krzyzewski and Pitino had played each other since ‘92. Sunday’s game will be their third meeting ever.


“That’s why we got them in the conference. Got to start doing this a little bit more,” Krzyzewski joked, referring to Louisville’s upcoming move to the ACC.


But almost nothing could top that first meeting between them.


The Blue Devils, led by Laettner and Grant Hill, were defending national champions in 1992. Kentucky was on the rise again after two years on probation. When they met in the old Spectrum for the East Region finals, it was a showdown of the 1 and 2 seeds, a game worthy of a national championship.


After coming from 10 down in regulation, Kentucky appeared to have the game won when Sean Woods made a running bank shot in the lane with 2.5 seconds left in overtime. Duke called a timeout, and gave the ball to Grant Hill to inbound.


The Wildcats knew the ball was going to Laettner, a 6-11 center who’d made a buzzer-beater against Connecticut in the regional finals two years earlier. But without Jamal Mashburn – he’d fouled out – Pitino pulled John Pelphrey and Deron Feldhaus aside and warned them not to foul.


“I said, ‘Whatever you do, don’t foul him. He hasn’t missed a shot,”’ Pitino recalled. “I shouldn’t have done that. That was the mistake I made. I should have said, ‘Whatever you do, bat down the ball. I don’t care what the contact is, go for the basketball.’


Anyone who’s ever watched the NCAA tournament in the last 21 years knows, Hill threw a strike from the far baseline and found Laettner at the foul line with his back to the basket. Laettner faked right, spun to his left and his 15-footer hit nothing but net as the buzzer sounded.


“I don’t think you can realize the significance at that time,” Krzyzewski said. “I will always remember the stark difference in emotion. Because, right in front of me, Richie Farmer collapsed. I see our guys jump and I see him fall. And really, I was more taken by Richie. I understood by looking at him ... just how tough that was.”


It was agonizing for the first 24 hours, Pitino said. But when he popped a tape of the game in the next day, he saw it in a different light.


“I just sat back and said, `Darn, that was some hell of a basketball game,”’ he said. “I got the guys together and I said, `Man, that was a great game.’ Really was a great game, especially playing without Mash.”


Duke would go on to win its second straight title, beating Michigan in the final. Kentucky would complete its revival four years later when the Wildcats beat Syracuse for their sixth NCAA title and first since 1978.


But it is that game that everyone remembers, and the years have done nothing to diminish it.



Trey Burke was a 16-month-old toddler the last time Michigan was still playing this late in the NCAA tournament.


That regional final 19 years ago, a loss that ended the Fab Five era, was played in a building that no longer exists. Where Reunion Arena once stood near downtown Dallas is now a vacant lot about 20 minutes from where the Wolverines finally get another chance to get back to the Final Four.


“It’s definitely crazy,” Burke said. “Just to get this program moving back in the right direction means a lot to us.”


No. 4 seed Michigan (29-7) plays SEC regular-season champion and No. 3 seed Florida (29-7) for the South Regional title on the raised court at ultramodern Cowboys Stadium today.


The Wolverines advanced largely because of Burke, the sophomore and Big Ten player of the year who scored 23 points – all after halftime – as they overcame a 14-point deficit against top seed Kansas. They forced overtime when Burke hit a long game-tying 3-pointer with 4.2 seconds left in regulation and won 87-85 in overtime.


“Yeah, I was surprised at how far I was,” Burke admitted after seeing multiple replays of the shot that may just become known as the Fab 3.


Burke also had 10 assists, making him the first player to have 20 points and 10 assists in the NCAA round of 16 since 1997. The last to do it? A Providence player known as “Billy The Kid” – aka Florida coach Billy Donovan, who will be on the opposite bench when his Gators play in their third consecutive regional final.


“It’s funny, my wife says to me this morning, she asked me the same question, she said, `Who was the player?’,” said Donovan, admitting that he already knew and remembered his numbers (26 points, 10 assists vs. Alabama). “And I said Magic Johnson. And she said, `No, you.’ I said I’m glad I’m comparing myself to Magic Johnson, that’s great.”


Florida has been to this point each of the last two years, but they haven’t been further since winning consecutive national championships under Donovan in 2006 and 2007.


After falling behind 15-4 early against Florida Gulf Coast, the high-flying No. 15 seed everybody knows now after an unprecedented run to the NCAA round of 16, the Gators recovered with a 16-0 run late in the first half to go ahead to stay in a 62-50 victory.


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